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The Rising Wedge & Ascending Triangle Pattern

The Rising Wedge & Ascending Triangle Pattern

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Rising wedge vs Ascending Triangle

The rising wedge and ascending triangle are two of the most important chart patterns for price action traders. Both patterns help to predict the further movement of the price of any financial asset.

 

The Rising Wedge

When the price fluctuates between two narrowing points, it will eventually end up in a rising wedge. The lines that are drawn along with these highs and lows form an imaginary angle that narrows over time to create this pattern—the more positive its slope (pointing upwards), indicating that there’s likely going be more growth ahead for our asset/ Trend!

A rising wedge is a bearish pattern that typically reversed an uptrend, but there are exceptions. In some cases when the price continued its previous downward trend after hitting this formation it turned out to be accurate for a further decline into nearby support or resistance levels at which point another run-up would begin again until reaching new highs eventually ending safely without any crashes like what happened during bull markets before these periods where traders could catch them easily by surprise due in large part because they never knew exactly how far things might go once started

A rising wedge is a bearish pattern that can be found in an uptrend. It is characterized by a narrowing of the price range as the trend progresses. This suggests that supply is beginning to outweigh demand and that the upward momentum is losing steam. Eventually, buyers will break down and sellers will take control of the market, leading to a price decline. To determine how the price will behave further, it is necessary to further analyze this instrument. The rising wedge is not a very common pattern and can be difficult to spot. However, it is important to be aware of this pattern in order to make informed trading decisions.

 

Rising wedge pattern

The Ascending Triangle

While ascending triangles are not very common, they are considered to be growth patterns. This means that regardless of the “weather” conditions before the pattern, the price of the financial instrument will rise after the completion and confirmation of the pattern. The main difference between an ascending triangle and a descending triangle is that in an ascending triangle, the highs remain constant while the lows increase. This creates a sloped line that eventually converges with the horizontal line, creating the triangle. The theory behind this pattern is that as buying pressure continues to increase, eventually, there will be a breakout above resistance, leading to even higher prices. While this is not always the case, it is important to be aware of this pattern so that you can make informed decisions about your investments.

Ascending triangle pattern

 

The Key Distinction Between a Rising Wedge & Ascending Triangle

The difference between a rising wedge and ascending triangle is quite clear when you look at the chart. In an ascending triangle, the resistance line is horizontal, while in a rising wedge, the resistance line has a slope. The direction of the two patterns is also different. An ascending triangle has a bullish direction, while a rising wedge has a bearish direction. The shape of the two patterns is also different. An ascending triangle has a flat top and a curved bottom, while a rising wedge has a sloping top and bottom. To avoid confusion, you need to watch the behavior of the price once the pattern is completed.

The question of whether a rising wedge is more reversal or trend continuation has been much debated by analysts. Most believe that it serves as a continuation pattern, while others view it as a potential reversal pattern. There are a few key differences between the two that can help to distinguish the two. First, volume is typically higher on downswings for the rising wedge, while it is higher on upswings for the ascending triangle. Second, the rising wedge typically has shallower slopes than the ascending triangle. Finally, the rising wedge typically forms after a period of consolidation, while the ascending triangle often forms after a steep decline. Taken together, these factors suggest that the rising wedge is more likely to be a continuation pattern than a reversal pattern. However, it is important to remember that no pattern is guaranteed to produce a particular outcome and that any given pattern should be considered in the context of the overall market trend.

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The Rising Wedge vs Ascending Triangle

The ascending triangle and rising wedge patterns are two of the most commonly used technical analysis tools. Both patterns are similar in that they provide clear entry and exit points for traders. However, there is a key difference between the two patterns that novice traders need to be aware of. The major difference between the two patterns lies in the resistance line. In an ascending triangle, the resistance line is horizontal, while in a rising wedge, the resistance line has a slight slope. This difference can be confusing for novice traders, but it is important to watch the behavior of price once the pattern is completed in order to avoid confusion. By understanding the key differences between these two patterns, traders can more effectively use them to their advantage.

If you’re a chart analyst, then it’s important to be able to identify different patterns in order to make predictions about future price movements. Two common patterns are the ascending triangle and the rising wedge. Both of these patterns serve the same function of indicating a potential reversal in the current trend. However, the rising wedge is generally considered to be more of a reversal pattern than the ascending triangle. This is because the volume is typically higher on the downswings in a rising wedge, while in an ascending triangle, the volume is typically higher on the upswing move. Therefore, if you want to further enhance your understanding of these patterns, you should focus on the volume.

What is the Best Way to Trade a Rising Wedge?

When trading a rising wedge, the standard way to open a position is to enter the market when the price breaks out above the resistance line. The resistance line is typically the trend line, which has a greater slope. Stop-loss is set either below the level or just below the low of the breakout candle. The target profit is located at the upper border of the pattern. If we consider trading a rising wedge as part of a pullback strategy, then our task is to find the right moment to enter the market.

The most conservative approach would be to wait for the price to break out above the resistance line and then enter the market. However, this could lead to us missing out on some potential profits. A more aggressive approach would be to enter the market as soon as the price starts to retrace back up towards the resistance line. This could give us a better chance of getting in at a lower price, but it does come with an increased risk of being stopped if the price doesn’t continue higher. Ultimately, it’s up to each individual trader to decide which approach they want to take.

Anytime you enter a trade, you are taking on some amount of risk. The key to successful trading is to manage that risk and ensure that the potential rewards of the trade outweigh the risks. One way to do this is to determine the ratio of risk to reward for a trade before entering into it. To do this, you need to estimate the approximate point of take profit. This will give you a target for your profits, and you can then calculate how much you are willing to risk in order to reach that target. By managing your risk in this way, you can increase the chances of success for your trades and overall profitability.

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The pros and cons of the rising wedge

Pros

1. Easily identified by more experienced traders, who can spot it in various markets.

2. It has a clear definition of stop, entry, and limit levels.

3. This offers a favorable risk/reward ratio for traders.

Cons

  • It’s often difficult to identify for novice traders.
  • It can mean both a reversal and continuation of the trend, so additional confirmation is needed.
  • Other technical indicators and oscillators should be consulted for confirmation.

How to trade the ascending triangle shape

There are a few different ways to trade an ascending triangle, depending on whether you think the price will break out or pull back. The standard way to open a position is to enter the market when the price breaks the resistance level for the ascending triangle (buy), the support level – for the downtrend (sell short), and the trend line – for the symmetric one (up–buy, down – sell short).

Stop-loss is set immediately behind the level or trend line. Another option is to wait for a breakout above or below the triangle, and then enter the market in that direction. This can be a bit riskier, as you may not get into your position at the optimal price. Finally, you could also wait for a pullback to one of the support or resistance levels before entering the market. This strategy may provide a better entry price, but it also carries more risk if the price doesn’t pull back as expected. Whichever strategy you choose, make sure you have a plan in place before entering any trades.

To open a position conservatively, we wait for the first price pullback after a breakout. We then set the stop loss in a similar fashion and only enter the market afterwards.

Remember to always be aware of your trade volume. When a breakout happens, levels increase significantly and continue this dynamic as the trend goes on. Also, don’t put limit orders too far away from the initial entry point. It’s much better to take the trade from the beginning than later down the line.

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The pros and cons of ascending triangle

Pros

  1. The pros of ascending triangle are that it is easy to spot on the chart, it has a clear target breakout level, and since it is a medium-term pattern, traders can make short-term trades within the pattern while preferring trades in the previous trend direction.
  2. The con of ascending triangle is that it can often trap traders into a false breakout.
  3. The ascending triangle can be found in both bullish and bearish markets.
  4. The length of time for an ascending triangle to form can vary greatly.It is very easy to spot on the chart.
  5. This pattern has a clear target breakout level.
  6. Since this is a medium-term pattern, traders can make short-term trades within the pattern while preferring trades in the previous trend direction.

Cons

  1. Breakouts can be false.
  2. The price may stay stable for an extended period or start falling.

Summary of rising wedge vs ascending triangle

In the world of price action trading, two popular patterns are the rising wedge and ascending triangle. A rising wedge is a reversal pattern, which means it indicates that the market is about to turn around and head in the opposite direction. An ascending triangle, on the other hand, is a continuation pattern, which means it indicates that the market is likely to keep going in the same direction. The major difference between the two patterns is that an ascending triangle has a horizontal resistance line, while a rising wedge does not. Both patterns can be traded through a breakout of the pattern or a pullback to the broken zone. These patterns are easy to identify but false breakouts may occur. When trading either of these patterns, it’s important to use caution and to be prepared for a possible false breakout.

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